Berkeley Fluids Seminar

University of California, Berkeley

Bring your lunch and enjoy learning about fluids!

Monday, October 23, 2017

12:00-13:00, 3110 Etcheverry Hall

Dr. Debanjan Mukherjee (UC Berkeley)

Understanding Blood Flow And Flow-mediated Transport Around Arterial Blood Clots

Abstract: Pathological clotting of blood, referred to as Thrombosis, comprises a major cause of several major cardiovascular diseases including stroke and heart attack. Additionally, thrombotic events induced by medical devices, or during surgical procedures, significantly reduce treatment efficacy and patient recovery. Advancing our understanding of the fundamental processes underlying thrombosis is therefore critical. A major challenge in this regard is to resolve the unsteady, pulsatile, arterial blood flow around, and hemodynamic loading on, realistic thrombi possessing arbitrary shape and microstructure. In this talk, I will discuss some of our recent work in addressing this challenge, using multi-scale hybrid particle-continuum computational approaches. The aspect of handling arbitrary morphology and microstructural heterogeneity will be elucidated, and its role on flow and flow-mediated transport in the thrombus neighborhood will be discussed. In particular, I will illustrate our findings on how flow organizes transport phenomena in the vicinity of large arterial clots. Finally, the resolution of flow induced loading on realistic thrombi, and subsequent thrombus mechanical response will be briefly illustrated.



Bio: Dr. Debanjan Mukherjee is currently an American Heart Association post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University of California, Berkeley. Prior to this, he obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from University of California, Berkeley, and a B.Tech from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India. His research interests lie at the interface of fluid mechanics and computational mechanics, with a focus on multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation of complex flow phenomena.




Back to my webpage


© Cédric Beaume